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Is Crypto Safe? What You Need to Know

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Is Crypto Safe? What You Need to Know

What You Need to Know About Crypto Security

The cryptocurrency market is booming with more new coins and startups than ever, but they’re not all created equal. Cryptocurrency is a trailblazing technology that could overhaul the financial systems of the future. However, it’s wise to do your homework before actively trading or investing in cryptocurrencies with price volatility and privacy concerns.

What Is A Cryptocurrency?

Digital money that makes use of cryptography to safeguard transactions and regulate the generation of new units is called Cryptocurrency. It’s called a cryptocurrency because it relies on cryptography’s encrypted form of data. Cryptography also provides anonymity for users by obscuring their identity and, indeed, all aspects of their transactions.

Cryptocurrencies can be mined, traded or used to purchase goods and services. A person would have to rely on already established relationships with merchants or banks to make purchases in the past. 

How Safe Is Cryptocurrency?

Cryptocurrency is more than an idea to create a digital form of currency at its core. Cybercriminals have learned that they can target these digital currencies because they are not regulated and not backed by any government. In theory, it’s tough to track down the source or the location of cryptocurrency transactions.

Cryptocurrencies are a prime target opening for cybercriminals since it’s difficult to trace transactions and identify the individuals involved.

How to Safeguard Your Cryptocurrencies

Cybersecurity in Cryptocurrency is a common issue and one that you should be aware of if considering an investment. Though the concerns are real, these problems can be mitigated mainly through a few simple security steps before trading or investing in Cryptocurrency.

Here are some basics steps to help secure your account from Cryptocurrency transactions:

Password Protection

Enable two-step authentication and password protect your computer when searching for cryptocurrency exchanges. This will prevent anyone from accessing your machines if they are stolen or hacked.

Use a Virtual Private Network

A virtual private network (VPN) is a computer network where you can hide your proper IP address. If a hacker were to try and break into your account, they would see an IP address from the VPN, so it would be impossible to gain access.

Backup Your Wallet

Backup information that includes public address and private keys. This will help you retrieve any lost currency or prevent others from transferring Cryptocurrency from your wallet.

Use Multiple Wallets

Using more than one Cryptocurrency wallet helps protect your investment from theft even if your account is compromised. If you have a cryptocurrency wallet on multiple devices and platforms, it’s easy to keep a backup of your information in case of an account breach.

What Are the Risks Associated with Cryptocurrency?

With all the blockchain talk about decentralization and anonymity, getting swept up in the hype is easy. Cryptocurrency has become a rapidly growing portion of the investing market, and many retail investors are looking to trade or invest in cryptocurrencies.

While the technology behind cryptocurrencies is impressive, risks are rushing, making trading and investing in Cryptocurrency risky for inexperienced traders. 

Phishing Scams

Phishing scams come in many forms, including emails and text messages. These scams can occur on an individual or a more general level, as most commonly happens. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) publishes information on detecting phishing scams. Still, it’s hard to tell the difference between a legitimate cryptocurrency exchange and an imposter because most large cryptocurrency exchanges do not have contact information listed for regulatory reasons.

Volatility

Cryptocurrency is a very volatile market that can swing wildly in either direction in almost no time at all. All cryptocurrencies are responsive to news, which can cause price changes within minutes or hours. There are also several different types of currencies, so you may have a hard time getting used to the volatility of each type. If you see only one digital currency (e.g., Bitcoin), it’s easy to assume stability when it’s still highly volatile.

Online Payments

While using crypto for online payments is a convenient method to pay for products and services, there are significant hazards involved with such transactions. When you pay for anything using bitcoin, you have no way of knowing the seller’s identity or having your payment details validated by a third party. You’re on your own if there’s an issue with the transaction.

With online purchases, you don’t have access to a complaint process, and there is no recourse if something goes wrong. This all results in anonymous transactions that pose risks online. As long as Cryptocurrency continues its rapid growth, this will be an iCryptocurrencyilers and sellers will need to solve.

Conclusion

Cryptocurrency is a highly sought-after currency for investors due to its untraceable nature and ability to exchange value without interference from a third party, such as a bank. However, this feature also makes it an appealing target for cybercriminals.

If you’re considering investing or trading in Cryptocurrency, educate yourself on the processes used to make transactions and invest your money safely and securely with reliable services that vet every transaction before letting it go through. Before diving in headfirst, make sure you research the different types of Cryptocurrency available and what risks are associated with each one. For more information on Cryptocurrency and its different types, visit our blog now!

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DLP Strategy for Your Business – How Significant Is It?

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DLP Strategy for Your Business - How Significant Is It?

Data is the lifeblood that fuel’s today’s information-based economy, so it’s incredibly crucial for businesses to keep sensitive information as secure as possible. And because of increasing concerns regarding cyber crimes such as data breaches, corporate espionage, and phishing scams, data loss prevention (DLP) strategies have become essential to running a business.

All About Data Loss Prevention

  • Data loss prevention, otherwise referred to as data leak protection, is a method that combines strategies, technologies, and processes to stop unauthorized individuals from accessing a company’s private data. It’s crucial to include DLP strategies in your business plan to detect potential exfiltration transmissions by monitoring, identifying, and blocking data while it is being used, in transit, and at rest.
    • Data In Use: It pertains to securing sensitive data in endpoints and applications as it is processed by authenticating users. In addition, controlling an individual’s ability to access sensitive data is also assessed.
    • Data In Motion: DLP ensures that confidential information is protected while being transmitted across networks. It encrypts the data using email and other messaging security platforms.
    • Data At Rest: Lastly, DLP protects sensitive data stored in databases, the cloud, and other storage mediums. It uses a multifaceted approach, including access control, data retention policies, and encryption.

Why Are DLP Strategies Important For Your Business?

  • Data loss leads to a financial crisis

Experts in the field of data security stated that the global average data breach costs went from $3.86 million to a whopping $4.24 million in 2021. And who knows what the statistics will be by the end of 2022? 

After seeing cybercriminals take big corporations’ ability to control their systems last year, it should be clear that data loss prevention strategies are essential in running a business.

  • Loss of productivity

As a business owner, you should always do what’s best for your company – continuous productivity to satisfy your customers, business partners, and ROI. With this in mind, incorporating DLP strategies should be a priority because it has the ability to prevent limited productivity.

  • Tarnished brand reputation

By having a standardized set of DLP strategies, your company will have excellent protection against cyberattacks. So thanks to data loss prevention methods, your business’ brand reputation won’t be humiliated by the public eye.

  • Compliance with government regulations

All businesses are required to comply with federal, state, international, and industry-mandated regulations, all of which aim to prevent data loss. If you fail to comply with these regulations, you’ll need to pay penalties and fines. This results in a loss of customer trust and ROI.

  • Hackers often target small businesses

Most business owners believe that hacktivists won’t attack small businesses when in fact, they voluntarily target startups and small-scale businesses due to a lack of proper data security protection. So despite having a small business, you shouldn’t skip on setting DLP strategies.

  • Cybercriminals are constantly evolving

Technology continues to grow at a rapid rate, and although this is excellent news for business owners, it’s also a piece of great info for cybercriminals. Because as technology evolves, hacktivists also find new ways to access sensitive information. It’s also important to know that although most cybercriminals work far from their targets, some work inside the company they plan to infiltrate.

But the good news is that you can prevent these threats from happening by proactively implementing DLP strategies.

The Takeaway

Although no organization is indeed 100% immune to data security risks, it’s vital to know that implementing a DLP strategy will give your business a protective edge. Because as your company’s IT environment develops robust data security measures, your journey to better data loss protection will flourish.

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Robert Bainbridge On How We Need To Adjust To The Future Of Work

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Business culture will also become even more important in the coming years. Those that can showcase their culture and mission the best will attract and retain the best talent.


As a part of our interview series called “How Employers and Employees are Reworking Work Together,” we had the pleasure to interview Robert Bainbridge.

Rob is Chief People Officer at Decision Intelligence company, Peak. He joined the Manchester-based tech scale up in 2016, and has been pivotal in building an international team that now spans the UK, US and India.

On a mission to change how the world works, Peak places huge importance on its culture; the company is built on strong values of smart, curious, open, driven and responsible. Rob and his team have grown the global Peak team by 230% in the last three years to over 200 people internationally, and are responsible for scaling Peak’s culture. The team is focussed on developing a culture of sustainable high performance, and this year Peak received the Best Companies 3-star accreditation, which recognizes extraordinary levels of employee engagement. Not only that, but Peak has ranked among the Sunday Times 100 Best Companies to Work For the last two years in a row.

Rob has nearly two decades of experience in talent management and acquisition in the tech and finance sectors. He joined Peak from Sympatico Consulting, a specialist HR and Recruitment consultancy he founded, and was previously Head of Practice at Harvey Nash.


Thank you for making time to visit with us about the topic of our time. Our readers would like to get to know you a bit better. Can you please tell us about one or two life experiences that most shaped who you are today?

Coming from a family of farmers I spent a lot of time, especially over summers, growing up around large groups of friends and family — people from different backgrounds, with different views. I think this gave me an understanding, appreciation and interest in people from an early age. That, and accidentally finding myself in a recruitment role (when trying to pursue a career in politics) in my early 20’s were the defining experiences in my career.

What do you predict will be the same about work, the workforce and the workplace 10–15 years from now? What do you predict will be different?

I think advancements, such as the metaverse, will have a drastic impact on the workforce as we know it. The metaverse is just in the beginning stages of development and there is still so much to uncover. In-person offices, virtual meetings, and day-to-day work schedules will take a new form as companies begin buying “office space” in the metaverse.

But the need for the workplace to be people-centric will never change, and rightly so. People power businesses, and I think we’ll see more and more employers support initiatives that help their teams to achieve a meaningful work-life balance through focused productivity and a truly people centered culture.

What advice would you offer to employers who want to future-proof their organizations?

Innovate for people, those that work for and with you, as well as your customers. The most successful innovators are the ones who put people first.

What do you predict will be the biggest gaps between what employers are willing to offer and what employees expect as we move forward? And what strategies would you offer about how to reconcile those gaps?

Since the Great Resignation, employees have begun demanding more time and resources to develop both personally and professionally. They are constantly looking for a chance to reskill and upskill, setting themselves up to grow into the next position of their respective career. Employers who are unable to accommodate growing employee demands will find themselves unable to retain top talent and stay competitive in their industry. To help reconcile the gap and retain talent, employers should encourage employees to use a certain percentage of their day to pursue growth opportunities or a chance to learn a new skill they are passionate about. This could help foster a work environment where employees feel like they can bring their whole selves and creative ideas to work every day.

We simultaneously joined a global experiment together last year called “Working From Home.” How will this experience influence the future of work?

After having the opportunity to work from home on flexible schedules, employees will be hesitant about returning to an office. Employers will need to get creative, offer hybrid work models, flexible work hours, amazing office space or the ability to work remotely to adapt to a new reality.

There will also be a larger emphasis on fostering work-life balance. Working from home caused high levels of burnout among employees, blurring the lines between work and private space. Moving forward, employers will need to start adopting methods to help them manage their stress and mental health, whatever work model they adopt.

We’ve all read the headlines about how the pandemic reshaped the workforce. What societal changes do you foresee as necessary to support a future of work that works for everyone?

There will be changes across all aspects of society, I think we are already starting to see the education and learning sectors adapt. With online courses and tutelage, you could learn to be a software engineer and start a job without ever meeting anyone in person. Whether that is a good thing or not is another question!

We can already see changes in the housing markets with people moving from cities or looking for apartments that have dedicated work space.

I also hope that the future of work may help level the playing field for candidates from diverse and underrepresented backgrounds. Remote and hybrid working could help remove some of the established barriers for these groups.

What is your greatest source of optimism about the future of work?

That individuals will be able to find a working style and environment that allows them to work at their best. Done well, this could lead to increased productivity, wellbeing, and as mentioned earlier, diversity in the workplace.

Our collective mental health and wellbeing are now considered collateral as we consider the future of work. What innovative strategies do you see employers offering to help improve and optimize their employee’s mental health and wellbeing?

The pandemic has forced many people to reevaluate their priorities and employees are demanding more from their employers. It will definitely be interesting to see how policies develop as the fight for talent intensifies, but I think because this is talent led the onus will be on businesses to deliver meaningful initiatives — gimmicks like unlimited ice cream or a ping pong table in the office simply won’t cut it anymore.

At Peak, we focus on work life balance. Our benefit suite prioritizes physical and mental wellbeing benefits. We have a Clubhouse first model, with hybrid working and flexible working hours, as well as a work from anywhere for one month policy. Peakers also have free access to Peak’s fit club, Headspace app and talking therapy support.

It seems like there’s a new headline every day. ‘The Great Resignation’. ‘The Great Reconfiguration’. And now the ‘Great Reevaluation’. What are the most important messages leaders need to hear from these headlines? How do company cultures need to evolve?

The most important message leaders need to hear is that employees are unhappy with the current state of the workforce. It’s time for companies to step back, reevaluate and look to improve to meet employee expectations. Aside from allowing employees to upskill and reskill, company’s need to create cultures predicated on an environment of trust, psychological safety and clear communication. Having a certain level of trust and openness among employees creates an environment where they feel like they are being heard and are comfortable voicing an opinion.

Let’s get more specific. What are your “Top 5 Trends To Track In the Future of Work?”

1 — Businesses’ operating models will increasingly become a key consideration for candidates when choosing a new role. We will continue to see high attrition while businesses work out how they are going to operate (remote, hybrid, full office) and people explore what works best for them.

2 — Business culture will also become even more important in the coming years. Those that can showcase their culture and mission the best will attract and retain the best talent.

3 — HR and Talent professionals’ value (and salaries) will increase as leaders continue to recognize the skills to be able to retain and find top talent are worth top dollar. HR and Talent professionals will need to add talent marketing and data skills to their toolbox, those that do will be the most valuable.

4 — Remote first and hybrid companies will begin to look further and further afield for talent, new skills hubs will emerge.

5 — The duty of care and the benefits employers offer will continue to evolve, both as part of their culture and their ability to attract and retain the type of people they need will be reflected in their benefit suite. Fresh fruit on a Monday won’t cut it!

I keep quotes on my desk and on scraps of paper to stay inspired. What’s your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? And how has this quote shaped your perspective?

I always love the Gary Player classic, “The harder I practice, the luckier I get.” I think the quote speaks for itself! I don’t believe in leaving things to chance when it comes to people operations, I also firmly believe that practice and a growth/learning mindset can get you where you want to go. That and always saying “yes” to an opportunity to develop yourself!

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US, with whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch, and why? He, she, or they might just see this if we tag them.

Having just finished watching the Beatles Get Back documentary, I’d go for Paul McCartney — he should also have some good tips on breaking into the US market (our next big challenge at Peak)!

Our readers often like to continue the conversation with our featured interviewees. How can they best connect with you and stay current on what you’re discovering?

You can connect with Peak on LinkedIn, Twitter or Facebook to keep an eye on what we’re up to. I’m not quite so good at keeping my channels up-to-date, but you can find me on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Thank you for sharing your insights and predictions. We appreciate the gift of your time and wish you continued success and good health.

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Stephen Tarleton On How We Need To Adjust To The Future Of Work

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Rise in digital empathy. I mentioned this one already but I really think this will be a gamechanger for the future of work. If companies refuse to bridge the expectations gap and embrace digital empathy — by bringing in new technology — they will become obsolete.


When it comes to designing the future of work, one size fits none. Discovering success isn’t about a hybrid model or offering remote work options. Individuals and organizations are looking for more freedom. The freedom to choose the work model that makes the most sense. The freedom to choose their own values. And the freedom to pursue what matters most. We reached out to successful leaders and thought leaders across all industries to glean their insights and predictions about how to create a future that works.

As a part of our interview series called “How Employers and Employees are Reworking Work Together,” we had the pleasure to interview Stephen Tarleton, CMO of 1E.

Stephen joined 1E at the beginning of this year to help hone and amplify 1E’s brand and to drive customer growth in the Digital Employee Experience (DEX) market. Prior to 1E, Stephen ran the marketing and business development organizations at Corvus Insurance and LogicMonitor. During his career, Stephen has worked at large enterprises, worked as a management consultant and even owned the top food truck business in Austin, Texas.


Thank you for making time to visit with us about the topic of our time. Our readers would like to get to know you a bit better. Can you please tell us about one or two life experiences that most shaped who you are today?

I was born and raised in Tarboro, a small town a little over an hour east of Raleigh, in the tobacco country of North Carolina. This environment provided me with a deep sense of community at an early age. Decades later, I am still in touch with many of the kids from my kindergarten class as well as high school and college. Being a part of a close knit, small community allowed me to create long lasting connections which have benefited my professional career — specifically, as it pertains to developing a professional network.

The flip side of this rural upbringing is that it created a desire for travel and exploration. The first time I flew on a commercial airline was for a job interview my senior year of college. Buying airline tickets was just not something my family did. Now, and for most of my adult life, I travel constantly, and get to live out my dream of traveling.

Let’s zoom out. What do you predict will be the same about work, the workforce and the workplace 10–15 years from now? What do you predict will be different?

The rapid shift to remote work in 2020 caused many changes to how businesses operate on a daily basis. As we look 10–15 years out, the importance of culture, productivity and maintaining an engaged workforce will remain a top priority. Businesses will still be looking for ways to improve the employee experience and will utilize the technology currently being developed to do that. Digital employee experience (DEX) tools are a great option as they serve as a catalyst to maintaining productivity and employee satisfaction. DEX tools monitor, analyze and optimize IT environments to ensure all employees have a seamless IT experience — regardless of their locations or the hours they’re working. Additionally, these tools also provide a competitive advantage. A decade from now, DEX tools will certainly be a “ticket-to-entry” requirement of employees when selecting a new job.

The biggest change we’ll see over the next few years is businesses continuing to expand their employee footprint. With the rise in fully remote or hybrid positions, a world of opportunity has opened up. Organizations can now expand into new regions and engage a more diverse and inclusive workforce without the constraints of the traditional 25-mile radius.

What advice would you offer to employers who want to future-proof their organizations?

The biggest piece of advice I would offer other business leaders would be to lean into the technology at your fingertips and to partner closely with your IT organization regardless of your function. Don’t think of IT as the team managing devices or end points; think of that team as your employee enablement organization. There is so much great technology out there that businesses can use to scale their companies and create a truly great employee experience — they just need to be unafraid to invest in something new.

To do that effectively, you need to work as a collective team and not as rogue departments. I learned this very early in my career with a major hand slap from a CIO for running a rogue server under my Business Intelligence Manager’s desk. To put this into practice and to be successful in the future flexible work environment, executive leadership teams should look at how they can break down the traditional department silos. This may mean partnering IT departments with other departments like HR and facilities management to ensure employees remain engaged and productive in every aspect of their day-to-day operations.

What do you predict will be the biggest gaps between what employers are willing to offer and what employees expect as we move forward? And what strategies would you offer about how to reconcile those gaps?

As the focus of the employee experience shifts from the physical to the digital world, the gap literally is the difference between what employees expect and what employers are willing to offer. When an employee is working from home, the road, or wherever else they find most productive, they want a seamless experience that moves with them. The traditional functions and realm of IT are now ‘table stakes,’ employees view connectivity, responsiveness, security, and working applications as basic needs to do their job.

To bridge the expectations gap, companies need to embrace digital empathy. A company that fully embraces digital empathy and fulfills the next level of employee needs — such as collaboration tools, autonomous remediation, sentiment measurement and tracking — will ultimately achieve employee empowerment. At 1E, we’ve altered our business model to create a more equitable environment for our workforce by introducing the concept of digital empathy. Our framework starts with our employees’ basic needs while working remotely — think connectivity and security — and combines it with their growth needs, such as autonomous remediation and user empowerment to create a foundation.

We simultaneously joined a global experiment together last year called “Working From Home.” How will this experience influence the future of work?

The work from home — or more accurately, the flexible work movement — over the last two years will forever change how we work, live, and play. Businesses have seen the benefit work from home has had on their employees’ mental health and wellbeing. But it has also shown just how productive you can be from a distance. The future of work will be hybrid and it will be distributed.

As I mentioned before, one of the biggest benefits to working from home is that businesses can expand to a global footprint and bring in top talent from around the world. I’m a great example of this. 1E is historically a UK-based company, but we are transitioning into a truly global organization and hiring leadership and employees with a remote-first mindset to help us get there. That’s how I was brought on as the CMO based in Texas. We’ll see more of this as the future of work unfolds.

We’ve all read the headlines about how the pandemic reshaped the workforce. What societal changes do you foresee as necessary to support a future of work that works for everyone?

To truly move everyone into the next phase of work, society needs to embrace the fact that employees want flexibility. For the most part we’ve seen this happen, but as COVID cases go down, employers are beginning to demand employees return to the office full-time or in a hybrid fashion. As this happens, society cannot forget about flexibility — or the fact that remote and flexible work has worked for over two years. Society needs to change its overall thinking from let’s get back to the old way of work to let’s embrace the world of flexibility.

What is your greatest source of optimism about the future of work?

As a parent, I tend to think of the future through the lens of my children. My oldest is in his first year of high school and is currently looking for a summer job. As opposed to applying to the local fast-food restaurant, he can embrace the remote/hybrid work model and is doing multiple, flexible, part time jobs. From walking dogs in the neighborhood to doing stock research for a financial fund, he will get a variety of experiences just from the new way the world is working. What makes me most optimistic about the future of work is the tools and resources the next generation has at such a young age that I could have never dreamed of at the same age.

Our collective mental health and wellbeing are now considered collateral as we consider the future of work. What innovative strategies do you see employers offering to help improve and optimize their employee’s mental health and wellbeing?

I feel like this is something we’re collectively still figuring out as the aftermath of the pandemic is starting to subside. But what I’ve seen is that employers have made significant strides in their flexibility offerings — which is promising. At 1E, we are a hybrid organization through and through, which gives our employees a lot of personal flexibility in how, where, and when they work. We have leaned into online communities and are providing periodic “wellbeing” sessions that are available to all employees to share how they’re feeling and have open and honest conversations.

From the employee perspective, I see a greater focus and importance on company values. In the past, company values were often just fodder for “About Us” pages, but now they are strong signals for how a company operates. As employees search for jobs, company values will offer a window into the soul of the organization and will serve a greater purpose in recruitment.

It seems like there’s a new headline every day. ‘The Great Resignation’. ‘The Great Reconfiguration’. And now the ‘Great Reevaluation’. What are the most important messages leaders need to hear from these headlines? How do company cultures need to evolve?

These headlines are not going away anytime soon, so it’s important for leaders across industries to find ways to ensure they are not the next victim of The Great Resignation. One of the first and best things business leaders can do in response to these headlines is reevaluate how they are measuring employee success and engagement. This includes leaning on IT and technology to keep track of productivity levels across a company. The data provided by this type of tools allows leaders to see where the holes are in their organization, understand how remote or in-office employees are feeling, and address the issues head on to create a more balanced work environment and culture.

As I mentioned earlier, DEX tools are a great starting point. Companies that prioritize DEX have historically experienced easier transitions for employees working either fully remote or with flexible schedules, which will ultimately provide businesses with reduced costs, improvements in employee satisfaction and overall productivity.

Let’s get more specific. What are your “Top 5 Trends To Track In the Future of Work?”

  1. Rise in digital empathy. I mentioned this one already but I really think this will be a gamechanger for the future of work. If companies refuse to bridge the expectations gap and embrace digital empathy — by bringing in new technology — they will become obsolete.
  2. The overlap of IT and HR. This is essentially what DEX is all about. In the future of work, companies with poor digital employee experiences will find they have a hard time retaining talent. In order to grow and maintain competitiveness in an increasingly competitive landscape, companies need to bring these two previously siloed departments together.
  3. Employee experience will help slow The Great Resignation. With great experience comes great success — and DEX tools will move to the forefront of digital workplace technology. Companies who invest in DEX tools will see less employee turnover related to IT dissatisfaction.
  4. The rise in office hubs. As we’ve started to see, organizations are forgoing their permanent office space and extending their hiring beyond the traditional 25-mile radius from that space. We’ll see more office hubs emerge for employees to gather for one-off meetings or company get-togethers.
  5. The blending of traditional employment and the gig economy. We’ll start to see knowledge workers become more specialized, and operate in an on-demand, auction-based market. A good example of this opportunity in the marketing world is SEO. Today companies either hire in-house or use an agency. Going forward, an SEO specialist could work individually on demand with multiple companies instead of having to join an agency or go fully in-house.

I keep quotes on my desk and on scraps of paper to stay inspired. What’s your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? And how has this quote shaped your perspective?

I’m a big Hemingway fan. In The Sun Also Rises, one of the characters states, (the) “Road to hell is paved with unbought stuffed dogs.” Out of context, it makes little sense, but it is about living in the moment and seizing opportunities as they present themselves. This is a philosophy I carry in both my personal and professional life.

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US, with whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch, and why? He, she, or they might just see this if we tag them.

This is a tough one. I grew up listening to the Beatles, so my top choice would be Paul McCartney. Watching the recent Get Back documentary reminded me just how creative the Beatles were. On a recent run in London, I searched for the building where they performed the rooftop concert. How I would love to have seen that live!

Our readers often like to continue the conversation with our featured interviewees. How can they best connect with you and stay current on what you’re discovering?

Readers can connect with me on LinkedIn and follow 1E on LinkedIn and Twitter. They can also check out 1E’s YouTube page for exclusive interviews and the latest product and service announcements.

Thank you for sharing your insights and predictions. We appreciate the gift of your time and wish you continued success and good health.

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