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David Peters On How We Need To Adjust To The Future Of Work

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…More gig and project work and workers — This has already started, and I expect it will continue in the future. During the pandemic, many workers decided to venture out on their own with varying degrees of success. The feeling seems to be that if they can’t find their dream job in the marketplace, why not create it? I think you will see more of this going forward. People will want to tailor their roles to their own preferences, and they may find that the only way to do this is to be an independent contractor.


When it comes to designing the future of work, one size fits none. Discovering success isn’t about a hybrid model or offering remote work options. Individuals and organizations are looking for more freedom. The freedom to choose the work model that makes the most sense. The freedom to choose their own values. And the freedom to pursue what matters most. We reached out to successful leaders and thought leaders across all industries to glean their insights and predictions about how to create a future that works.

As a part of our interview series called “How Employers and Employees are Reworking Work Together,” we had the pleasure to interview David Peters.

David Peters is a financial advisor, tax practitioner, educator, and entrepreneur. As the Director of Financial Planning Services for CFO Capital Management in Westport, CT, he helps clients reach their financial and retirement goals. He also founded a continuing education website for financial professionals (www.petersprofessionaleducation.com) and speaks at seminars all over the country.


Thank you for making time to visit with us about the topic of our time. Our readers would like to get to know you a bit better. Can you please tell us about one or two life experiences that most shaped who you are today.

In 2009, I took a position as a staff accountant at Elephant Auto Insurance, a new insurance start-up in Richmond, Virginia. Like most start-ups, money was tight in the early days. We didn’t pay the highest salaries in town, nor did we have the best benefit package in the area. However, we consistently won awards for being the best place to work in those early years. What drew me to Elephant (and what I believe drew many new hires to us in the early years) was how well the company treated people. Little things like encouraging staff to speak up and offer ideas during meetings, being transparent about how the company was doing, and letting people execute the work in the way they felt was best make a difference. When you show people trust, respect their ideas, and allow them to own their work, they will run through a wall for you and your business. It all starts with real, honest respect though. If you want a good work environment, that’s how you build it.

Outside of the business world, my most formative experiences have been as a volunteer. When I was in graduate school, I volunteered my time as a hospital chaplain at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. I used to spend my time visiting with patients — sometimes talking about spiritual matters, but mainly just talking about life. Often times, people would tell me about their families, careers, and how they ended up in the hospital. Some conversations were tough. Sometimes the patients I saw were dealing with life and death matters. However, even in the toughest of conversations, I learned the power of listening. I learned that if you listen long enough, people will tell you their life story and their opinions on almost everything! Too often, we have a need to fill space with our voices. If you listen first and talk second though, you tend to learn and understand more. This is a lesson I still carry with me to this day when I am meeting with clients and business partners. Relationships deepen when you listen first.

Let’s zoom out. What do you predict will be the same about work, the workforce and the workplace 10–15 years from now? What do you predict will be different?

Over the next 10 to 15 years, I think you are going to see lots of changes. The workforce of today wants more than just a job with a solid salary. They want a job that is stable where they can make a difference. I think this is only going to continue in the future in a more pronounced way. People are not going to be content with just lofty generalities about how “everyone is important here.” They are going to want to see how their specific career projection looks. They are going to want benefits packages that are catered to their specific needs. In many ways, recruiting will become more individualized.

I also think that competition for talent will continue to increase. The pandemic taught many companies that their work could be done by employees whether they were in the office or a million miles away. This greatly increases the potential talent pool available to employers, but also increases the competition for that talent. If geography does not matter, any company can make an offer to any employee that meets the job requirements. I expect these trends to continue in the future. Companies will be forced to become more aggressive in pursuing talent. Smaller companies will need to offer something unique about how they work in order to be considered by potential hires. Competition for employees will become global.

As a result of this, I think you will see companies taking a harder look at their people needs in the future as well. If competition is more intense for talent, the hiring process is likely to take longer. Businesses may be more willing to look for alternatives to hiring before going through that process. They may look to implement systems first or they may try to get more out of the talent that they already have. In short, why go through the pain of hiring someone new, if we can just simply expand the role of someone we already have? I think you will see companies more often asking themselves, do we really need someone in this spot?

Perhaps the one thing that will not change though is that business success will still depend on leadership being able to bring people together towards a common goal. The way that we communicate may change. The environment that we work in may change. The products we offer may change. However, building a business and good leadership necessarily depend on getting everyone moving in the same direction. This may be more challenging if everyone is not physically in the same location every day.

Similarly, brand identity will continue to be important in the future as well. We buy the products and services that we know and trust. If business is done more online in the future (which it likely will be), company identity will not be based on a store front. Company identity will remain important — but it will be based less on the sign out in front of the building or the office environment. Companies will need to find other ways to make their identity unique in the minds of consumers and business partners.

What advice would you offer to employers who want to future-proof their organizations?

Don’t try to insulate your company from change. It will never work. Instead, try to focus on relationships and the things that really drive success. Relationships with people are fundamental to business. Instead of trying to insist that people work in a particular way, try to find ways that will make building relationships easier. Make it easy for customers to find you. Make it easier for employees to find you. This may mean providing alternative ways of communicating. It may mean deviating from your normal way of working. I think it is really easy to get caught up with all of the what-ifs in the future. Instead of worrying about that, worry about building and fostering relationships — and the rest will fall into place.

What do you predict will be the biggest gaps between what employers are willing to offer and what employees expect as we move forward? And what strategies would you offer about how to reconcile those gaps?

I think employees expect to have more insight into their futures these days. They want more individually tailored positions that fit their lifestyle. They want employment that is steady but offers them flexibility. Also, since unemployment rates are relatively low right now, salary demands will also be higher in the short run as well. Employers will need to balance this and the business needs that they have with the flexibility and individualization that employees demand. From an employer perspective, I think the best strategy is to really think about what is necessary for a position and what isn’t. Do you need an employee that is available between 9 and 5? Or can you be flexible on work hours?

On a much higher level, I would also suggest that employers can and should take a look at whether they need people to fill certain positions as well. Instead of hiring someone new, is there a way to move existing resources to fill the need? If so, promoting from within may have a positive effect on company culture and also help the company to stay streamlined.

We simultaneously joined a global experiment together last year called “Working From Home.” How will this experience influence the future of work?

The pandemic really forced us to re-evaluate how we viewed work. There were some companies that were experimenting with the idea of letting employees work from home even before lockdown. The pandemic forced us to rethink what could and could not be done from home. It taught us that employees could work from home and get things done just as efficiently as they could in the office. It taught us that we could maintain communication with clients and hold meetings over the internet. In-person meetings were not as necessary for our business as maybe we thought. Most importantly, it taught us that we could still sell products and services even though we were working from home.

As a result of this experience, I think companies are now more open to alternative working arrangements than ever before. We used to look at working from home as being a lesser form of work. It was an alternative that was really used only when someone could not make it to the office. Now, we are thinking about it as a way to offer employees a more flexible schedule and a way to save money by spending less time driving to the office. We are beginning to look at working from home as an opportunity, rather than a barrier.

I think you will see this continue. Companies will continue to push the lines about what is necessary to do in-person and what isn’t. They will continue to question their former ways of doing business and look for alternatives that will help make employees’ lives easier. You will see more companies give up their physical office space and encourage employees to work in ways that they deem to be best. They will empower employees to work on their own and at the times they want — rather than dictating when, where, and how things need to be done.

The pandemic opened companies’ eyes to what was possible in a remote environment. Instead of thinking about what they will do when things “go back to normal,” businesses are thinking about how they can build on what they are doing remotely.

We’ve all read the headlines about how the pandemic reshaped the workforce. What societal changes do you foresee as necessary to support a future of work that works for everyone?

One of the big things that we learned during the pandemic was that we are social people. We don’t do well in isolation. While mental wellness is not a new issue, it became an area of focus during lockdown partly because we missed the connectedness that came with going through our day to day lives. Finding ways to stay connected to our colleagues, clients, and business partners is imperative in the future working environment. Working from home looks like it is here to stay, so we as a society need to continue to explore ways that we can work from different geographic locations without feeling isolated.

Secondly, in order for a more permanent work from home environment to be successful for everyone, we have to make it more acceptable for people to place boundaries on their working hours. Working from home can provide increased flexibility in terms of when we work. However, if we want this for ourselves, we need to be more accepting of the fact that not everyone works at the same time. It needs to be okay not to return emails right away. It needs to be okay to not be available right at 9am during the week. I believe we are working towards a more flexible and fluid workday. If that’s the case, then we need to get rid of some of the expectations that we have historically had for others.

Finally, we need to be more accepting of people’s personal lives when it leaks into their professional lives. I still occasionally hear stories of people getting angry when a child enters into the room during a conference call. I had someone in one of my classes get upset when my doorbell rang while I was teaching a class online. We need to be more forgiving of these types of things. If we are okay with people working from their living room, we have to be okay with personal and professional lives bumping into each other sometimes.

What is your greatest source of optimism about the future of work?

All of the opportunities! In the future, geography doesn’t matter and collaboration opportunities are infinite. You can partner with almost anyone. The talent pool is endless. Your day is less structured and you have more autonomy to create. In my opinion, the future of work is more exciting than scary because you can just simply do more without having to physically be at the office.

Our collective mental health and wellbeing are now considered collateral as we consider the future of work. What innovative strategies do you see employers offering to help improve and optimize their employee’s mental health and wellbeing?

The key to better mental health in the workplace is realizing that we are social beings, whether we are working from home or at the office. In short, we need to interact with other people. It is good for us to talk and collaborate on business issues. As we move forward into the future, we need to make mental health an okay thing to talk about in the workplace. We need to encourage workers to come forward when they are not feeling right. We need to encourage managers to check-in regularly with staff — sort of the remote work equivalent to management by walking around. We need to encourage staff members to check-in with each other. We also need to make resources available when employees have things that they need to talk about. I don’t just mean a phone number we hand to an employee that is experiencing an issue. I don’t just mean human resources staff hearing problems either. I mean real professionals who have real training in how to help people who are having problems. Companies should partner with mental health professionals to offer services when companies have employees who need help. This is not hard to do. Trained professionals can meet with people over the internet, if necessary — so really it is just companies forming those relationships with mental health professionals.

For so long, mental health was not something we talked about in the workplace. It was almost taboo or a sign of weakness to admit that you were having a problem. The pandemic was terrible in so many ways, but perhaps one good thing that came out of it is that mental health problems are starting to be something that we talk about. We have a lot of work to do, but I am glad to see that companies are starting to pay attention to these issues. Mental health is just as important as the physical health of our employees.

It seems like there’s a new headline every day. ‘The Great Resignation’. ‘The Great Reconfiguration’. And now the ‘Great Reevaluation’. What are the most important messages leaders need to hear from these headlines? How do company cultures need to evolve?

The most obvious takeaways that I see are that employees are losing engagement very quickly and the old days of people just being happy to have a job are going away. It used to be enough for employers to simply offer a position to an employee with stability and solid pay. However, that’s not enough now. Employees want more. They want to feel like they are a part of something. They want to see career trajectory. They want a job that fits their life with benefits that are meaningful to them. While the talent pool is bigger these days for employers, the competition is also global now when it comes to recruiting. Employees who are good at what they do can afford to be picky now. They don’t want just any job. They want a job that is tailored to them and plays to their skills.

If employers are going to remain competitive, they need to reconsider how they recruit. Don’t just put out a position and try to find someone to fill out. Think in-depth about how interviewees could potentially fill a role. Think about how the organization could benefit from the skills they bring — not just what skills does this position need. In short, make recruiting more like a business partnership. How can the business and potential employee work together?

This is not to say that organizations should bend their operations around each new hire. However, it does mean that people nowadays want more insight into how they are going to be used and where they fit. The key to keeping people engaged over the long run is helping them to see where they are headed. If they can see that, their work becomes more meaningful.

Let’s get more specific. What are your “Top 5 Trends To Track In the Future of Work?” (Please share a story or example for each.)

  1. Finding innovative ways to brand without using a store front — If you have less companies that have a physical office space, you lose some impressions with customers. They can no longer drive by and see your presence in the communities that they are in. You can do TV commercials or internet ads, but these are very crowded spaces. Especially for smaller companies, cost may be prohibitive as well. So I think you will start to see companies experimenting with different ways to brand themselves without using their physical office space. For example, one financial services firm that I heard about used to hold in-person conferences for their clients once per year. As part of that conference, they used to have catered lunches paid for by some of the local restaurants in town. During lockdown, they held their conference virtually but also sent clients Grub Hub gift cards so that they could have food delivered to their house while they were at the conference. I have also heard of companies sending more handwritten thank you notes and birthday cards than they ever have before. While some of these things were being done before the pandemic, they were not as prevalent. I think you will see companies investing more time in these activities going forward. Essentially, I think you will see companies taking the approach that if they can’t see clients in-person, they will do everything they can think of to create a personal connection and touch — outside of the normal channels.
  2. More gig and project work and workers — This has already started, and I expect it will continue in the future. During the pandemic, many workers decided to venture out on their own with varying degrees of success. The feeling seems to be that if they can’t find their dream job in the marketplace, why not create it? I think you will see more of this going forward. People will want to tailor their roles to their own preferences, and they may find that the only way to do this is to be an independent contractor.
  3. More individually tailored benefits and working conditions — People are not just looking for standardized positions and benefits anymore. They are looking for work that fits their life. So I think you will see benefits packages that fit people’s lives as well. For example, I think you will see employees asking for home office stipends, technology requests that enable easier work from home, and work schedules that are even more flexible. Companies will focus less on providing benefits like gyms in the office, wellness programs, and Blue Jean Fridays. They will look to tailor benefits — and work together with employees to offer benefits that are individualized.
  4. Less churn and burn positions — I love being a CPA, but one thing I have always struggled with is the churn and burn positions. For some reason, we feel like those in public accounting need to “prove themselves” by working through busy season and the 17-hour days that go along with it. Accounting is not the only industry like that. Higher-end law firms, consulting firms, and investment banking firms have similar “rights of passage.” In all of these cases, many firms hire with the idea that a certain percentage of their new hires will not make it through the initial busy season. They expect a certain number of people to burn out quickly. They plan their budgets around this expectation. The next recruiting year, the cycle starts over again. I think you will see these types of churn and burn positions start to disappear in the future. Today’s worker is more picky. They are not just looking for a high paying job. They are looking for a job that fits them and their personality. They are looking for stability, but also career trajectory. If firms continue recruiting for churn and burn positions in the same way they always have, then you will simply find less people going into that industry. In the accounting industry, for example, you are seeing less students coming out of school with accounting degrees than before. I think you will continue to see trends like this, if firms keep with the traditional churn and burn mentality. The workforce has changed. Firms need to change with it.
  5. Less defined hours and times of work — The Great Resignation has taught us that people are looking to work on their own terms these days. They want positions that fit their lifestyles — not necessarily positions that require them to change their lifestyle to fit the job. That being said, I think you will see a trend of companies allowing more and more freedom in terms of when and how work gets done. During the pandemic, you saw many couples adjusting their schedules to accommodate their children. You might have one spouse work in the morning and the other spouse work in the afternoon in an effort to have one of them available at all times for their kids. While this was done out of necessity during lockdown, I think many companies realized that it was possible to let people choose when they work. It was possible to be flexible with the schedule while still getting everything done. I think this will continue. Companies will focus more on the work getting done and less on the times when it is done. You are already seeing this in small glimpses and I think it will continue.

I keep quotes on my desk and on scraps of paper to stay inspired. What’s your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? And how has this quote shaped your perspective?

I had a mentor of mine who used to always say “perfect is the enemy of the good” — which is a quote that is often attributed to Voltaire. When my mentor used to say it, what he meant was that if you have to be perfect in everything, you won’t accomplish nearly as much. Not everything needs perfection. You don’t always need perfect information to make decisions. Sometimes mostly correct information is enough to do something noteworthy.

I am not really sure if that is what Voltaire meant or not! However, I have always tried to differentiate between places in my business life where I need to be perfect and places where I don’t need to be. If a client is trying to make an important decision based on an area of the tax law, I need to be perfect. The client expects that from me. However, if I am trying to figure out where to take that same client to lunch, that probably doesn’t require me to be perfect. A few places are probably fine.

We spend a lot of time making decisions on things that don’t matter. Don’t spend time trying to be perfect in areas where no one cares. You don’t need all the information for every decision. That just causes us to be slow and inefficient.

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US, with whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch, and why? He, she, or they might just see this if we tag them.

I have always been fascinated by Warren Buffett. There is a simplicity in his approach to investing and business that I have always found to be refreshing. In the finance world, there is a lot of big talk and large egos, yet Buffett seems to always keep things in perspective. When he is wrong, he admits it. In a world of complex business and investing strategies, Buffett keeps things simple and remains phenomenally successful. That is someone to learn something from!

Our readers often like to continue the conversation with our featured interviewees. How can they best connect with you and stay current on what you’re discovering?

Absolutely! If readers would like to get a hold of me, they are welcome to visit my website at: www.davidpetersfinancial.com.

They are also welcome to reach out to me on social media as well:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/david-peters-financial

Twitter: @DavidPFinancial

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/davidpetersfinancial/

They can also send me an email: david@cfocapmgmt.com

Thank you for sharing your insights and predictions. We appreciate the gift of your time and wish you continued success and good health.

Thank you so much for the opportunity to share my thoughts! I greatly appreciate it!

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DLP Strategy for Your Business – How Significant Is It?

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DLP Strategy for Your Business - How Significant Is It?

Data is the lifeblood that fuel’s today’s information-based economy, so it’s incredibly crucial for businesses to keep sensitive information as secure as possible. And because of increasing concerns regarding cyber crimes such as data breaches, corporate espionage, and phishing scams, data loss prevention (DLP) strategies have become essential to running a business.

All About Data Loss Prevention

  • Data loss prevention, otherwise referred to as data leak protection, is a method that combines strategies, technologies, and processes to stop unauthorized individuals from accessing a company’s private data. It’s crucial to include DLP strategies in your business plan to detect potential exfiltration transmissions by monitoring, identifying, and blocking data while it is being used, in transit, and at rest.
    • Data In Use: It pertains to securing sensitive data in endpoints and applications as it is processed by authenticating users. In addition, controlling an individual’s ability to access sensitive data is also assessed.
    • Data In Motion: DLP ensures that confidential information is protected while being transmitted across networks. It encrypts the data using email and other messaging security platforms.
    • Data At Rest: Lastly, DLP protects sensitive data stored in databases, the cloud, and other storage mediums. It uses a multifaceted approach, including access control, data retention policies, and encryption.

Why Are DLP Strategies Important For Your Business?

  • Data loss leads to a financial crisis

Experts in the field of data security stated that the global average data breach costs went from $3.86 million to a whopping $4.24 million in 2021. And who knows what the statistics will be by the end of 2022? 

After seeing cybercriminals take big corporations’ ability to control their systems last year, it should be clear that data loss prevention strategies are essential in running a business.

  • Loss of productivity

As a business owner, you should always do what’s best for your company – continuous productivity to satisfy your customers, business partners, and ROI. With this in mind, incorporating DLP strategies should be a priority because it has the ability to prevent limited productivity.

  • Tarnished brand reputation

By having a standardized set of DLP strategies, your company will have excellent protection against cyberattacks. So thanks to data loss prevention methods, your business’ brand reputation won’t be humiliated by the public eye.

  • Compliance with government regulations

All businesses are required to comply with federal, state, international, and industry-mandated regulations, all of which aim to prevent data loss. If you fail to comply with these regulations, you’ll need to pay penalties and fines. This results in a loss of customer trust and ROI.

  • Hackers often target small businesses

Most business owners believe that hacktivists won’t attack small businesses when in fact, they voluntarily target startups and small-scale businesses due to a lack of proper data security protection. So despite having a small business, you shouldn’t skip on setting DLP strategies.

  • Cybercriminals are constantly evolving

Technology continues to grow at a rapid rate, and although this is excellent news for business owners, it’s also a piece of great info for cybercriminals. Because as technology evolves, hacktivists also find new ways to access sensitive information. It’s also important to know that although most cybercriminals work far from their targets, some work inside the company they plan to infiltrate.

But the good news is that you can prevent these threats from happening by proactively implementing DLP strategies.

The Takeaway

Although no organization is indeed 100% immune to data security risks, it’s vital to know that implementing a DLP strategy will give your business a protective edge. Because as your company’s IT environment develops robust data security measures, your journey to better data loss protection will flourish.

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Stephen Tarleton On How We Need To Adjust To The Future Of Work

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Rise in digital empathy. I mentioned this one already but I really think this will be a gamechanger for the future of work. If companies refuse to bridge the expectations gap and embrace digital empathy — by bringing in new technology — they will become obsolete.


When it comes to designing the future of work, one size fits none. Discovering success isn’t about a hybrid model or offering remote work options. Individuals and organizations are looking for more freedom. The freedom to choose the work model that makes the most sense. The freedom to choose their own values. And the freedom to pursue what matters most. We reached out to successful leaders and thought leaders across all industries to glean their insights and predictions about how to create a future that works.

As a part of our interview series called “How Employers and Employees are Reworking Work Together,” we had the pleasure to interview Stephen Tarleton, CMO of 1E.

Stephen joined 1E at the beginning of this year to help hone and amplify 1E’s brand and to drive customer growth in the Digital Employee Experience (DEX) market. Prior to 1E, Stephen ran the marketing and business development organizations at Corvus Insurance and LogicMonitor. During his career, Stephen has worked at large enterprises, worked as a management consultant and even owned the top food truck business in Austin, Texas.


Thank you for making time to visit with us about the topic of our time. Our readers would like to get to know you a bit better. Can you please tell us about one or two life experiences that most shaped who you are today?

I was born and raised in Tarboro, a small town a little over an hour east of Raleigh, in the tobacco country of North Carolina. This environment provided me with a deep sense of community at an early age. Decades later, I am still in touch with many of the kids from my kindergarten class as well as high school and college. Being a part of a close knit, small community allowed me to create long lasting connections which have benefited my professional career — specifically, as it pertains to developing a professional network.

The flip side of this rural upbringing is that it created a desire for travel and exploration. The first time I flew on a commercial airline was for a job interview my senior year of college. Buying airline tickets was just not something my family did. Now, and for most of my adult life, I travel constantly, and get to live out my dream of traveling.

Let’s zoom out. What do you predict will be the same about work, the workforce and the workplace 10–15 years from now? What do you predict will be different?

The rapid shift to remote work in 2020 caused many changes to how businesses operate on a daily basis. As we look 10–15 years out, the importance of culture, productivity and maintaining an engaged workforce will remain a top priority. Businesses will still be looking for ways to improve the employee experience and will utilize the technology currently being developed to do that. Digital employee experience (DEX) tools are a great option as they serve as a catalyst to maintaining productivity and employee satisfaction. DEX tools monitor, analyze and optimize IT environments to ensure all employees have a seamless IT experience — regardless of their locations or the hours they’re working. Additionally, these tools also provide a competitive advantage. A decade from now, DEX tools will certainly be a “ticket-to-entry” requirement of employees when selecting a new job.

The biggest change we’ll see over the next few years is businesses continuing to expand their employee footprint. With the rise in fully remote or hybrid positions, a world of opportunity has opened up. Organizations can now expand into new regions and engage a more diverse and inclusive workforce without the constraints of the traditional 25-mile radius.

What advice would you offer to employers who want to future-proof their organizations?

The biggest piece of advice I would offer other business leaders would be to lean into the technology at your fingertips and to partner closely with your IT organization regardless of your function. Don’t think of IT as the team managing devices or end points; think of that team as your employee enablement organization. There is so much great technology out there that businesses can use to scale their companies and create a truly great employee experience — they just need to be unafraid to invest in something new.

To do that effectively, you need to work as a collective team and not as rogue departments. I learned this very early in my career with a major hand slap from a CIO for running a rogue server under my Business Intelligence Manager’s desk. To put this into practice and to be successful in the future flexible work environment, executive leadership teams should look at how they can break down the traditional department silos. This may mean partnering IT departments with other departments like HR and facilities management to ensure employees remain engaged and productive in every aspect of their day-to-day operations.

What do you predict will be the biggest gaps between what employers are willing to offer and what employees expect as we move forward? And what strategies would you offer about how to reconcile those gaps?

As the focus of the employee experience shifts from the physical to the digital world, the gap literally is the difference between what employees expect and what employers are willing to offer. When an employee is working from home, the road, or wherever else they find most productive, they want a seamless experience that moves with them. The traditional functions and realm of IT are now ‘table stakes,’ employees view connectivity, responsiveness, security, and working applications as basic needs to do their job.

To bridge the expectations gap, companies need to embrace digital empathy. A company that fully embraces digital empathy and fulfills the next level of employee needs — such as collaboration tools, autonomous remediation, sentiment measurement and tracking — will ultimately achieve employee empowerment. At 1E, we’ve altered our business model to create a more equitable environment for our workforce by introducing the concept of digital empathy. Our framework starts with our employees’ basic needs while working remotely — think connectivity and security — and combines it with their growth needs, such as autonomous remediation and user empowerment to create a foundation.

We simultaneously joined a global experiment together last year called “Working From Home.” How will this experience influence the future of work?

The work from home — or more accurately, the flexible work movement — over the last two years will forever change how we work, live, and play. Businesses have seen the benefit work from home has had on their employees’ mental health and wellbeing. But it has also shown just how productive you can be from a distance. The future of work will be hybrid and it will be distributed.

As I mentioned before, one of the biggest benefits to working from home is that businesses can expand to a global footprint and bring in top talent from around the world. I’m a great example of this. 1E is historically a UK-based company, but we are transitioning into a truly global organization and hiring leadership and employees with a remote-first mindset to help us get there. That’s how I was brought on as the CMO based in Texas. We’ll see more of this as the future of work unfolds.

We’ve all read the headlines about how the pandemic reshaped the workforce. What societal changes do you foresee as necessary to support a future of work that works for everyone?

To truly move everyone into the next phase of work, society needs to embrace the fact that employees want flexibility. For the most part we’ve seen this happen, but as COVID cases go down, employers are beginning to demand employees return to the office full-time or in a hybrid fashion. As this happens, society cannot forget about flexibility — or the fact that remote and flexible work has worked for over two years. Society needs to change its overall thinking from let’s get back to the old way of work to let’s embrace the world of flexibility.

What is your greatest source of optimism about the future of work?

As a parent, I tend to think of the future through the lens of my children. My oldest is in his first year of high school and is currently looking for a summer job. As opposed to applying to the local fast-food restaurant, he can embrace the remote/hybrid work model and is doing multiple, flexible, part time jobs. From walking dogs in the neighborhood to doing stock research for a financial fund, he will get a variety of experiences just from the new way the world is working. What makes me most optimistic about the future of work is the tools and resources the next generation has at such a young age that I could have never dreamed of at the same age.

Our collective mental health and wellbeing are now considered collateral as we consider the future of work. What innovative strategies do you see employers offering to help improve and optimize their employee’s mental health and wellbeing?

I feel like this is something we’re collectively still figuring out as the aftermath of the pandemic is starting to subside. But what I’ve seen is that employers have made significant strides in their flexibility offerings — which is promising. At 1E, we are a hybrid organization through and through, which gives our employees a lot of personal flexibility in how, where, and when they work. We have leaned into online communities and are providing periodic “wellbeing” sessions that are available to all employees to share how they’re feeling and have open and honest conversations.

From the employee perspective, I see a greater focus and importance on company values. In the past, company values were often just fodder for “About Us” pages, but now they are strong signals for how a company operates. As employees search for jobs, company values will offer a window into the soul of the organization and will serve a greater purpose in recruitment.

It seems like there’s a new headline every day. ‘The Great Resignation’. ‘The Great Reconfiguration’. And now the ‘Great Reevaluation’. What are the most important messages leaders need to hear from these headlines? How do company cultures need to evolve?

These headlines are not going away anytime soon, so it’s important for leaders across industries to find ways to ensure they are not the next victim of The Great Resignation. One of the first and best things business leaders can do in response to these headlines is reevaluate how they are measuring employee success and engagement. This includes leaning on IT and technology to keep track of productivity levels across a company. The data provided by this type of tools allows leaders to see where the holes are in their organization, understand how remote or in-office employees are feeling, and address the issues head on to create a more balanced work environment and culture.

As I mentioned earlier, DEX tools are a great starting point. Companies that prioritize DEX have historically experienced easier transitions for employees working either fully remote or with flexible schedules, which will ultimately provide businesses with reduced costs, improvements in employee satisfaction and overall productivity.

Let’s get more specific. What are your “Top 5 Trends To Track In the Future of Work?”

  1. Rise in digital empathy. I mentioned this one already but I really think this will be a gamechanger for the future of work. If companies refuse to bridge the expectations gap and embrace digital empathy — by bringing in new technology — they will become obsolete.
  2. The overlap of IT and HR. This is essentially what DEX is all about. In the future of work, companies with poor digital employee experiences will find they have a hard time retaining talent. In order to grow and maintain competitiveness in an increasingly competitive landscape, companies need to bring these two previously siloed departments together.
  3. Employee experience will help slow The Great Resignation. With great experience comes great success — and DEX tools will move to the forefront of digital workplace technology. Companies who invest in DEX tools will see less employee turnover related to IT dissatisfaction.
  4. The rise in office hubs. As we’ve started to see, organizations are forgoing their permanent office space and extending their hiring beyond the traditional 25-mile radius from that space. We’ll see more office hubs emerge for employees to gather for one-off meetings or company get-togethers.
  5. The blending of traditional employment and the gig economy. We’ll start to see knowledge workers become more specialized, and operate in an on-demand, auction-based market. A good example of this opportunity in the marketing world is SEO. Today companies either hire in-house or use an agency. Going forward, an SEO specialist could work individually on demand with multiple companies instead of having to join an agency or go fully in-house.

I keep quotes on my desk and on scraps of paper to stay inspired. What’s your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? And how has this quote shaped your perspective?

I’m a big Hemingway fan. In The Sun Also Rises, one of the characters states, (the) “Road to hell is paved with unbought stuffed dogs.” Out of context, it makes little sense, but it is about living in the moment and seizing opportunities as they present themselves. This is a philosophy I carry in both my personal and professional life.

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US, with whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch, and why? He, she, or they might just see this if we tag them.

This is a tough one. I grew up listening to the Beatles, so my top choice would be Paul McCartney. Watching the recent Get Back documentary reminded me just how creative the Beatles were. On a recent run in London, I searched for the building where they performed the rooftop concert. How I would love to have seen that live!

Our readers often like to continue the conversation with our featured interviewees. How can they best connect with you and stay current on what you’re discovering?

Readers can connect with me on LinkedIn and follow 1E on LinkedIn and Twitter. They can also check out 1E’s YouTube page for exclusive interviews and the latest product and service announcements.

Thank you for sharing your insights and predictions. We appreciate the gift of your time and wish you continued success and good health.

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Celebrating International Youth Day – 06 Nonprofits empowering the youth to lead the world 

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It is estimated that half of the young children between the ages of six and thirteen lack basic literacy and numeracy skills and that childhood poverty is one of the most prevalent problems worldwide. According to World Health Organization, globally, one in seven 10-19-year-olds experiences a mental disorder. 

UN’s International Youth Day is intended to draw attention to these issues and encourage action to solve them. Beginning in 2000, the day is celebrated each year on the 12th of August with a theme. The theme for 2022 is “Intergenerational solidarity: Creating a world for all ages.” This theme aims to raise awareness about the need to act across generations to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and leave no one behind. 

Goodera has compiled a list of nonprofit organizations that aim to empower youth and make resources available to them. Keep reading to find out more about the organizations and consider supporting their cause.

1. Limitless is providing youth with resources to build meaningful lives 

Limitless empowers youth to discover their worth, find hope, and live meaningful lives. They strive to end the powerlessness caused by poverty, mental illness, and social inequality. Among the services they provide are outreach, social work, mentorship, career counseling, and scholarships for youth and their families.

2. 100cameras is instilling hope in youth with photography skills

100cameras works with youth around the world who have endured challenging experiences. Through photography, they teach them how to tell their stories in a way that impacts their self-image and involvement in their communities. They offer a customized curriculum that combines storytelling with technical photography skills. They provide a setting where young people can tell their stories without judgment or expectations and gain hope for the future by processing and revealing their past and present. Additionally, they offer a platform for selling photographs.  All proceeds go directly towards funding the most pressing needs in their communities, so they can see how their contribution is making a difference.

3. Majulah assists youth in self-discovery and skills enhancement 

Majulah Community believes that every young person has the potential to make a positive impact on the world. Established in 2010, the organization is on a mission to create changemakers. To help youth through every stage of their lives, they work with changemakers, families, teachers, and fellow non-profits. A number of programs are offered, including the Heroes League, a mentoring program that develops heroes, the Everest Programme, which provides experiences outside the classroom, and after-school programs.

4. Words4Weapon is on a mission to create safer communities 

Words4Weapon advocates for reducing knife crimes in the UK. Since its inception in 2007, this weapons-surrender charity has been placing knife bins across towns and cities in the UK. They are working with the motto of “Collecting Knives, Saving Lives”. Its vision is to leverage the power of education to reduce knife-based violence and crimes in the UK. To promote the same, they offer a range of education services like training for youth workers and awareness sessions. Additionally, they also provide training courses for the youth to develop their own anti-knife crime programs. 

5. Pomoc deci is striving to mitigate the effects of violence and poverty on the youth 

The Pomoc deci organization was founded in 2003. The organization provides high-quality childcare and education for children 0-18 years old, as well as assistance to young people in finding their own place in Serbia. Pomoc deci (CYSO) focuses on three main programs: Quality Education for All (equal education for all children, improved education for ethnic minorities from pre-school to adulthood), Youth Mobilization (community needs, social partnership at the local level, primary health, capacity building for local NGOs) and Preventing Child Trafficking.

6. Change Happens! is empowering the youth to understand their potential 

Change Happens!, formerly Families Under Urban & Social Attack (FUUSA), works to transform the lives of families and children in high-risk communities in the Gulf Coast Region 6. Over the past 25 years, the organization has grown from one program to over 18 programs. Also, its service area has expanded beyond Houston’s Third Ward to cover 13 counties along the Gulf Coast. The organization provides a variety of programs that are designed to empower individuals to help themselves. Each year, Change Happens! empowers and educates over 100,000 adults and adolescents while continually positioning itself to increase its impact on local neighborhoods.

Youth are an important resource for achieving the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals. In addition to bringing to light issues facing the youth, International Youth Day helps lay the groundwork for future success. Come join us as we celebrate the strength of the youth and encourage them to take action to build a better tomorrow.  

Are you a nonprofit professional? Share your impact story with our team to get featured and reach a global network of corporate volunteers powering the world of good.

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